It’s A Bit Froggy

Photo by Brenda Cox

“I’ve always wanted to come to China for their frog pudding and dilapidated doorways.”

“You mean frog legs and antique Chinese doors.”

“Frog legs?” she looked at him in alarm.

“Yes.  Frog legs are usually stir fried and mixed with light spices, stewed, fried, or made into congee.  It’s a popular dish in Cantonese cuisine.”

“Are frog legs safe to eat?”

“Yes.  It’s as safe as eating chicken or beef or pork..”

“Have you ever eaten them?

“Yes.”

“What do they taste like?”

“Chicken.  Stir-fried frog legs are very tasty.

”I think I’ll pass.”

“You don’t know what you’re missing.”

100 Words

This post is for the Friday’s Fictioneers hosted by  Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  You can find this week’s prompt Here. To read other stories or to participate, click Here. Also written posted for April 2021 Writing Prompts – #23 – Frog pudding and dilapidated doorways

Source: Wikipedia

37 comments

  1. That happens often, one’s ‘tasty’ is the other’s ‘eww’. Adjusting to culture is one thing, adjusting to the food… not so easy.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. In Peru they eat guinea pigs and they tried to make this a staple in America with guinea pig burgers. Just didn’t catch on. Too many people have them as pets. But if it had, I bet they’d say “It tastes like chicken” too. 😂

    Liked by 2 people

  3. And yet tasting the food of another culture can be so enriching. I remember a friend telling me about going to teach English in China in the 80s. She was the first westerner to be in the small town and a welcome dinner was held in her honour. Because she was the principal guest, she was given the best part of the fish to eat. Everyone watched as she swallowed…the eyeballs. As she said, ‘There was nothing else to be done. It would have been a huge insult not to eat them.’

    Liked by 2 people

    • Yes, she had to go through with it or risk insulting them. Wow the pressure she must have been under but she did it. Good for her. I don’t know if I would have been able to. I would probably settle go on a vegetarian diet if I were to visit China.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. It is funny how many cultures do eat frog legs. I’ve heard people call the French “frogs” because of this dish and my “country cousins” (Kentucky) would eat fresh frog legs. They had a special trident like “frog gig” used for “gigging frogs”. Me? I’m with you and don’t feel like trying…

    Liked by 2 people

  5. I’ve had frog legs… I much prefer chicken. And no, they don’t taste quite the same. There is a subtle difference in texture and flavor. In desperation (face of starvation) I miiiight eat them again. But I gotta be really really starving. Not my favorite. In fact, I’d rather eat fish…and I hate fish! Great story, though.

    Liked by 2 people

    • I think that’s the default answer–that it tastes like chicken or maybe it’s to persuade the person to try it. Either way, I’ll pass. I don’t mind fish. I like salmon and cod. Thanks, Bear 🙂 Am happy you liked the story.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. What people like to eat amazes me, how do they develop such tastes. I was offered snake soup with chrysalis flowers, if my hosts had not told me about all the ingredients then I might have tried some. But I am afraid my mind and stomach screamed NO NO!

    Liked by 2 people

    • I agree with you, James. I enjoy different cuisines but there are certain things I would never try, no matter how well prepared they are. It’s good that you listened to your mind and stomach 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Dear Adele,

    If a person can get past what they are, frog’s legs have a flavor close to chicken, but a lighter more delicate flavor. Yes. I’ve cooked and eaten them. 😉 Good dialogue.

    Shalom,

    Rochelle

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Even though I’ve traveled a lot, I used to be skittish about trying “strange” things. It’s been pleasantly surprising to try new dishes in different cultures. My daughter is a foodie and she has helped me try some really interesting, yet yummy, things. Love this one, Adele!

    Liked by 2 people

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