Assimilation

spf-march-30-19

Photo Credit: Susan Spaulding

Assimilation.  It was something Chaska fought against from the very start.  Much like I tried to fight my attraction and gradual love for him.  We were of different cultures and races.  I always believed that one day after I left college, I would marry a colored man.  Never once did I ever imagine that I would end up falling in love with a Lakota Sioux man.

The moment I saw him, I sensed that I was in grave trouble.  He was bigger than life but at the same time, reserved.  He was strong not just physically but spiritually and mentally.  I was struck by his features—handsome, weather-beaten face, smooth dark skin and long, thick, flowing black hair and his quiet strength.

He and two other Indians enrolled in this historically black college.  It was clear that they felt out of place and resisted wearing the uniforms but I persuaded him to and he them.  He disliked being in a classroom, saying that outdoors would be better– nature would be the classroom.  The desks were set up in the woods behind the college.  Years later, they still sit there, neglected.  As for me, I’ve a happy home elsewhere with Chaska.

 

 

200 Words

This story was inspired by the 1999 movie, Unbowed.  It’s a story about three Lakota Sioux men who enroll in a historically black college, and their reluctance to assimilate causes friction between their black peers. Some come to embrace their similar history, while others remain bitter.  One of them falls in love with a black woman.

This was written for Sunday Photo Fiction hosted by Susan Spaulding. For more details visit Here.  To read more of the stories based on this week’s prompt, visit Here.

8 responses to “Assimilation

  1. It pains me to know that there are schools restricted (even, and perhaps especially by the minds of the majority of students) by color in this day and age. We are all people of color. It seems as though we are faced with so many real problems in this life, creating them by bias, and prejudice is just an unnecessary ill.. Wonderful choice of difficult subject matter and delivery.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You’re right, Violet. I just finished watching the movie, Unbowed and was struck by how those who suffered discrimination and racism showed the same to others. The blacks saw the Indians as savages and the Indians saw the blacks as being like the white man who oppressed them. There was a lot of friction and a lot of clashes and hostility between the two. In the midst of it all, one of the Indian men (the chief) and a black teacher fell in love. She was engaged to a fine man and fellow teacher. Prejudice is an unnecessary ill and it’s sad that it still exists. Thanks. I’m happy liked my choice and delivery of a difficult subject matter.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s