Well Worth It/Watcher #writephoto

waiting

Photo by Sue Vincent

I stand here, in the mist, waiting.  Waiting for you.  Every year, I come to the spot where we last parted company and where you promised me that you would be upon your return after the journey which called you away suddenly.   You stood before me, your eyes holding mine captive as you professed your love for me and promised me that only a matter of the most urgent nature could part you from me.  Then, you took me in your arms and held me so close that I could feel your beating heart.  I felt so safe and warm in your arms.  I didn’t want you to let me go.  But you did.  I suddenly felt very cold.  The tears mingled with the dew as you cupped my face between your hands and our lips met in a kiss that made my heart sing and cry at the same time.

When finally, we drew back, neither of us wanted to be the first to leave.  We stood there, delaying the inevitable, still holding hands and shrouded in the thick mist that rose above the hills.  Then, you said to me, “Close your eyes.”  And I did.  Even as I felt you let go of my hands, I kept my eyes closed.  After a while I slowly opened them and you were gone.  It was as if the mist had swallowed you up.  I stood there for some time, hoping that you would come back but you didn’t.

Weeks, months and even years passed and still you haven’t come back.  Every day I come here, hoping to find you or that you would come to me but all I see is the mist–the mist which rises above the mountains and the mist that covers my heart.  I read your letters over and over because they are all I have of you.  They fill me with sadness, joy, longing and hope.  They are stained with my tears.

How much longer shall we be apart, Alfred?  It has been ten, long years since we stood here.  I hold in my hand your most recent letter in which you swore that you will soon return.   Dare I hope again when my hopes have been dashed so many times?   The years apart have not lessened or dulled my love for you in fact they have intensified it but how long shall I continue to wait for you?  What if–I can hardly bear to think it, but sensibility says I must–you never return?  What if you decide that you would rather be a free agent?  Oh, the thought distresses me greatly.

I clutch the letter in my hand tightly.  I must believe that one day very soon we shall meet upon this mountain on a clear day.   Until then, I shall be here waiting for you.

I turn to leave and then I see you coming towards me.  I blinked, thinking that I am imagining it but you’re real and now you are running towards me.  I start to running towards you, laughing and tears running down my cheeks.  When we reach each other, you pick me up and swung me around.  I cling to you, feeling a little giddy but I’m over the moon.  Ten years, three months, four days and six hours later my wait was finally over.  Alfred and I were back together again.  After he put me down and I caught my breath, he got down on his knee and proposed.  Delirious with joy, I accepted and the following week we got married.

A couple of weeks later, we packed up and moved to London where Alfred worked as a solicitor in the office owned and run by the uncle whose urgent business was the cause for our long separation.  The said uncle had suddenly taken ill and needed someone to be in charge of his business until he recovered.  Since his nephew was a lawyer and a very promising one at that, he employed him.  His uncle was so impressed with him that even after he recovered from his illness, he encouraged him to remain in his employ.

When it seemed that his stay would be indefinite, Alfred begged to take leave of his uncle so that he could come back to me.  It was then his uncle suggested the move to London.  And here we are, living in London and not far from the famous Sherlock Holmes at 221B Baker Street.  I like it here although I miss the mountains and the mist sometimes.  What matters most to me is not where I am but that I am with Alfred.  And nothing except death will part us.  And all those years I waited for him were well worth it.

True love is worth waiting for even if it takes a lifetime. Then in return a lifetime of love will be waiting for you – Anurag Prakash Ray

This story is in response to the Thursday Photo Prompt – Watcher for Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo.

The Old Lady

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PHOTO PROMPT © Nathan Sowers 

Catherine leaned the mirror against the pole so that she could gaze upon the reflection of the abandoned house.  Her curiosity was piqued when her brother, Gerald claimed that when he rode past here a fortnight ago, he saw an old lady appear at the window.  She disappeared as he approached.  He tried the door but it was locked.  Puzzled, he went away.

Catherine turned now when she saw a figure appear at the window.  Cautiously, she approached.

The old lady smiled.  “Hello, Catherine.”

“Who are you?”

“Come in and I shall tell you.”

The door swung open.

Catherine entered.

 

100 Words

This was written for the Friday Fictioneers challenge hosted by Rochelle Wisoff-Fields.  For  more details, visit Here.   To read stories of 100 words based on this week’s prompt, visit Here.

Cat

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Sheila stood at the window gazing at the city skyline illuminated in the setting sun.  Below the streets pulsated with life.  Behind her, she could hear Adam in the kitchen.

She smiled.  He’d finally invited her for dinner.  They’d been partners for a year now.  When she first joined the force, she was determined not get involved with a fellow officer but that was before she met Adam.  Who could resist those smoky brown eyes and the incredible smile which made her heart flutter?

She turned from the window.  Her eyes fell on the porcelain dog, Cat’s gift to Adam.  They met at Tim Horton’s where Cat worked.  One afternoon as she handed him the donuts, he asked her out and she readily said yes.   They dated and in the summer, he proposed.  Then, she and her dog were struck by a van at an intersection.  As she picked up the porcelain, she saw the connection.  The dog and the donuts, the girl and the cop.  How does one compete with a memory?  Sheila sighed.

175 Words

This was written as part of Flash Fiction for Aspiring Writers hosted by Priceless Joy. For more information visit Here.  To read other stories based on this week’s prompt, visit Here.

The Ruin of Sarah Ann Johnston

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Photo by John Brand

Every time Grandma and I walked past the abandoned house with the gigantic grass shaped cross, she would tell the sad story of Sarah Ann Johnston.  I indulged her.  She was getting up there and forgot that she had told me the story many times before.  I just listened as she talked about the downfall of the reputed most Christian woman who ever lived in Green Bay County.

“We warned her not marry him,” Grandma said, shaking her head.  “but she wouldn’t listen.  We told her that she shouldn’t be unequally yoked with a man who didn’t have a religious bone in him but she foolishly believed that she could reform him.

“Everyone in the county except me went to the wedding.  I’m no hypocrite.  I wasn’t going stand up there and pretend like I approved.  Sarah Ann was mad at me, of course, but I had to be true to myself.”

“It wasn’t long before things got bad between them.  She caught him red-handed with another woman and shot them dead.  Now she’s in jail.  Foolish woman, she should have listened.”

Poor Sarah Anne Johnston.  Her blind and foolish love led to her ruin.

195 Words

This was written for Sunday Photo Fiction hosted by Susan Spaulding. For more details visit Here.  To read other stories based on this week’s prompt, visit Here.

Delight in the Lord

I had a dream one morning in which someone said, “Give God your best and He will do the rest.”  I mentioned this to my husband, Dave and he thought of what it said about the desires of our hearts in Psalm 37 which I looked up.

Delight yourself also in the Lord, And He shall give you the desires of your heart.  Commit your way to the Lord, Trust also in Him, And He shall bring it to pass.  Rest in the Lord, and wait patiently for Him (verses 4, 5, 7).

I believe that this is God’s message to Dave and me.  We are to give ourselves completely to Him and He will take care of everything else.  It takes a lot of faith and strength to wait on the Lord as He works things out for us, especially during those times when the light at the tunnel seems to be eluding us.  But, we remember His faithfulness to us in the past and how He brought us through then.  And we think, why should this time be any different?  So, we pray, rest and wait.

Thank You, Lord, for this message and the reassurance that You will take care of us.  All we have to do is delight ourselves in You, commit our ways to You and trust You.

The Dinner

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It was Monday morning and Lillian was still feeling tired from a very busy weekend.  Before going to the office, she stopped at Tim Horton’s for a coffee.  She grabbed one for Kabir as well.  He was on a conference call so she quietly popped into his office, set the coffee down on his desk and left.

As usual, he looked really good in his suit.  Easy girl.  He’s your boss, remember?  That doesn’t mean I can’t appreciate what a fine looking man he is.

She sat down at her desk, switched on her laptop and took a couple of sips of the hot coffee.  It hit the right spot.  She logged on to and began to check her emails.  Just then her cell rang.  She quickly answered it.  It was Neil.

“So you make it into work okay.”

“Yes.  I was dozing on the train, though and almost missed my stop.  How about you?”

“I’m off this week.”

“Lucky you.”

“Say, if you’re not doing anything later, maybe we can hook up and take in a movie or something.”

“Sorry, Neil but I’m not in the mood to go anywhere.  It’s going to be an early night for me.”

“Some other time then.”

I doubt it.  You’re a nice guy but I’m just not into you.  “Gotta go, Neil.  Have  good day.”

“Thanks.  You too, Lil.”

She ended the call just as Kabir stepped out of his office.  He stood by her desk, coffee in hand, watching her.  “Sorry, I’ll turn it off,”  she said.

He waved her apology aside.  “Don’t worry about it,” he said.  “Thanks for the coffee.”

She smiled.  “You’re welcome.”

“Did you have a good weekend?”

She nodded.  “I did but it was a crazy busy one.  I had to drag myself out of bed this morning.  This coffee is a lifesaver.  How about you?”

“Well, my weekend wasn’t as exciting as yours.  My parents are visiting from Florida.  They’re staying with my sister and her family.”

“Oh yes, you mentioned on Friday that they were coming.  When did they arrive?”

“On Friday evening.”

“How long are they going to be here for?”

“Two weeks.”

“Is this their first visit to Toronto?”

“No, they’ve been here before.  Although they like Toronto, they prefer Miami where it’s always warm.”

“I know the winters here could be brutal sometimes.”

“Are you busy tomorrow evening?” he asked suddenly, startling her.

She shook her head.  “No.”  Did he want her to work late?

“I’m taking my parents out for dinner and was wondering if you would like to join us?”

It took a moment before she said, “Sure.”

He smiled.  “Good.  Well, I’d better get back to work.  Thanks again for the coffee.”

After he walked away, she sat there, daydreaming.  He had asked her to have dinner with him–well, with his parents and him but that was still something, wasn’t it?

Dinner turned out to be a very enjoyable affair.  She liked his parents, especially his father who made her laugh so much that tears were coming out of her eyes.  His mother was more serious and very direct.  Several times Lillian caught her looking at her as if trying to size her up.  It was clear that Kabir was the apple of her eye and like most mothers with their sons, she was protective.  Any woman who wanted to be with him had to win her approval.  Was it obvious to her that Lillian was in love with her son?  It seemed like women picked up on these things easily.

“So, Kabir mentioned that you’ve been working with him for five years.  Is he a good boss?”

Lillian nodded.  “Yes, he is.”

“He isn’t working you too hard, is he?”

Lillian shook her head.  “No.  He’s a very fair boss.  I enjoy working with him.”

“Good.  And what about your family?  Are they here in Toronto?”

“My parents live in Kingston, Jamaica while my brother lives in Vancouver with his family.”

“Are you close to your family?”

“Yes, we’re very close.  We keep in touch every day and see each other in the summer and for Christmas.”

“Good.  Family is very important.  We’re a close family too.”

Just then Kabir’s Dad needed to go to the washroom and Kabir went with him.  Alone with his mother, Lillian felt a bit nervous, wondering what else she was going to ask her.  “Kabir mentioned that you’ve been to Toronto once before.”

“Yes.  We visited six years ago.  It’s a very nice city but the winters are too cold.  That’s why everyone comes to Miami for Christmas.  The cold is bad for the husband’s knees, you know.”

“It’s the same with my mother.  That’s why she doesn’t want to live here.”

“Kabir has told us so much about you.”

Lillian looked at her in surprise.  “He has?”

“Yes.  Every time we talk to him, he mentions you.  He wanted us to meet you the next time we came to Toronto.  Do you have a boyfriend?”

“No.”

“Good, because Kabir doesn’t have a girlfriend.  He probably won’t appreciate me telling you this but he likes you.  What about you, do you like him?”

“Yes, I like him too.”

“Then, I think it’s time that the two of you started dating.”

Before Lillian could answer, the men were back.  Kabir looked at his mother first and then at her.  And the way he looked at her made her pulse quicken.  For the remainder of the evening they stole glances at each other and after he dropped his parents off, he asked her as they were driving to her place, “Did my mother say something to you?”

“Well, she said that you like me.”

“She’s right, Lillian.  I do.  I like you very much.”

“And I–I like you very much too.”

He looked at her as they waited at a traffic light.  “So, you wouldn’t have a problem going out with me, then?”

She shook her head.  “No.”

He smiled.  “Good.”

For their first date, they did something unconventional but fun–they played board games at board games at Snakes and Lattes.  For the second date they enjoyed a twilight picnic at Casa Loma.  The next time Lillian saw Kabir’s parents it was in December when they flew to Miami for the Christmas holidays.  They were engaged.

The Queen of Soul

“When God loves you, what can be better than that?” ~ Aretha Franklin

There is so much I could write about Aretha Franklin, the Queen of Soul but I decided to concentrate on the highlights of her music career and her “social and civic contributions”.

Aretha Louise Franklin was  born on March 25, 1942 in Memphis, Tennessee.  Her father, Clarence LaVaughn “C. L.” Franklin was a Baptist minister and a circuit preacher while her mother, Barbara was an accomplished piano player and vocalist.  Theirs was a troubled marriage because of her father’s philandering.  The couple separated in 1948.  Before her tenth birthday, Aretha’s mother died from a heart attack.  Several women, including her grandmother and Mahalia Jackson alternated helping the children at the Franklin home and it was during this time that Aretha learned to play the piano by ear.

Following her mother’s death, Aretha began singing solos at New Bethel, debuting with the hymn, “Jesus, Be a Fence Around Me.”  When she was twelve, her father became her manager, bringing her on the road with him during his “gospel caravan” tours for her to perform in various churches.

Her music career found Aretha signing on with big recording giants such as Columbia, Atlantic, Arista and RCA.  She belted out many hits such as You Make Me Feel Like a Natural Woman, I Say A Little Prayer, Hold On, I’m Comin’.  And she thrilled the younger generation with Who’s Zoomin’ Who and Freeway of Love.  Hearing Freeway of Love transported me back to the ’80s which were a great time for me when I was living in New York.  And who could forget I Knew You Were Waiting For Me, her number one duet with George Michael?

In 1980, she gave a command performance before the Queen at Prince Albert’s Hall, in 2009 she sang at the 2009 inauguration of President Barak Obama.  In the following year, she received an honorary degree from Yale University.  In 2014, she received honorary degrees from Harvard University and New York University as well as honorary doctorates in music from Princeton, Yale, Brown, Pennsylvania, Berkeley, New England Conservatory of Music and University of Michigan.  She was the recipient of other honors such as Doctor of Humane Letters and Doctor of Law degree.

Aretha was dubbed “one of the giants of soul music, and indeed of American pop as a whole.  More than any other performer, she epitomized soul at its most gospel-charged.”  Her voice was described as being a “powerful mezzo-soprano voice” and she was praised for her arrangements and interpretations of other artists’ hit songs.  At the age of 14 when she recorded her first album, Songs of Faith, Jerry Wexler declared that her voice “was not that of a child but rather of an ecstatic hierophant.”  A hierophant is a person who brings religious congregants into the presence of that which is deemed holy.  Aretha’s explanation for that would have likely been, “Being a singer is a natural gift. It means I’m using to the highest degree possible the gift that God gave me to use. I’m happy with that.”

Singing and music weren’t her only passions.  Aretha was a civil rights activist.  Throughout her life, she was involved in the struggle for civil rights and women’s rights.  When Angela Davis was jailed in 1970, Aretha told Jet Magazine that, “Angela Davis must go free… Black people will be free. I’ve been locked up (for disturbing the peace in Detroit) and I know you got to disturb the peace when you can’t get no peace. Jail is hell to be in. I’m going to see her free if there is any justice in our courts, not because I believe in communism, but because she’s a Black woman and she wants freedom for Black people.”  Not surprisingly, her songs “Respect” and “Natural Woman” became anthems of these movements for social change.  She was also a staunch supporter of Native American rights, supporting their struggles worldwide and movements which fostered their cultural rights.

“We all require and want respect, man or woman, black or white. It’s our basic human right” ~ Aretha Franklin

It was a sad day when it was announced that the great Aretha Franklin passed away after losing her battle with pancreatic cancer.  She leaves behind a world touched by her music, her incomparable voice and her effortless work in championing human, civil and women’s rights.  She was the first woman to be inducted in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.  She received the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2005.  In 2013, she was again ranked first in Rolling Stone magazine’s “100 Greatest Singers” list.

“American history wells up when Aretha sings.  Nobody embodies more fully the connection between the African-American spiritual, the blues, R&B, rock and roll—the way that hardship and sorrow were transformed into something full of beauty and vitality and hope” – President Obama in response to her performance of “A Natural Woman” at the 2015 Kennedy Center Honors.

Notes to Women salutes the woman with “the voice of the civil rights movement, the voice of black America” and a “symbol of black equality”  She was an inspiration not only for those in the music world but for all of us.  Although she is no longer with us, her music, her legacy will live on.

“It really is an honor if I can be inspirational to a younger singer or person. It means I’ve done my job” ~ Aretha Franklin

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Sources:  Wikipedia; Brainy Quote